Breaking News:
  • Registrati

Scienzaonline

Home Scienceonline

Scienceonline

Some cows may be predisposed to subacute ruminal acidosis

E-mail Stampa

Some cows are more at risk for SARA than others

 

Cattle with subacute ruminal acidosis suffer from a number of low-level ailments that affect productivity. A research team led by University of Illinois scientists has documented changes in pH, microbiome, and rumen epithelial cells in SARA-affected cows. Results indicate that some animals may be predisposed to SARA because of an overabundance of certain bacteria. Scientists are not sure why some cows develop the condition known as subacute ruminal acidosis, or SARA, but producers know it causes a number of minor symptoms that add up to major problems over time. “Subacute ruminal acidosis is what happens when the pH of the rumen – the large compartment of a cow’s stomach – gets too low. It’s not severe, but it’s lower than ideal. It’s difficult to detect. Because of that, we don’t have a great understanding of how it happens and what are the contributing factors,” says assistant professor of animal sciences Josh McCann.

 

Geophagy: Eating soil could harm babies

E-mail Stampa

Excessive lead concentration: nearly 5x the levels found in newborns in Austria

 

Up to 80% of people in Africa, especially women, regularly eat clayey soil – this habit is known as geophagy. A previous study conducted at MedUni Vienna has already shown that it is a form of craving. Now researchers from the Center for Public Health and the Institute of Medical Genetics at MedUni Vienna have shown that this practice can also be detrimental to health: pregnant women who consume particular types of soil display higher levels of lead contamination – as do their babies. That is the finding of a study that was produced for the dissertations of two students (Rosina Glaunach and Coloman Deweis) of MedUni Vienna and that has now been published in "Environmental Research".

 

Movie research results: Multitasking overloads the brain

E-mail Stampa

The subjects’ brain areas functioned more smoothly when they watched the films in longer segments. Image: Juha Lahnakoski

 

The brain works most efficiently when it can focus on a single task for a longer period of time. Previous research shows that multitasking, which means performing several tasks at the same time, reduces productivity by as much as 40%. Now a group of researchers specialising in brain imaging has found that changing tasks too frequently interferes with brain activity. This may explain why the end result is worse than when a person focuses on one task at a time. ‘We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure different brain areas of our research subjects while they watched short segments of the Star Wars, Indiana Jones and James Bond movies,’ explains Aalto University Associate Professor Iiro Jääskeläinen.

 

Al di là del DNA: scoperto un nuovo meccanismo epigenetico di trasmissione dell’eredità

E-mail Stampa

Le tre drosofile rappresentate nella figura hanno la stessa sequenza di DNA ma i loro occhi sono di colore differente a causa di une perturbazione transitoria del loro stato epigenetico che si traduce in una modificazione del livello di repressione, dipendente dai geni Polycomb, di un gene responsabile del colore degli occhi.

 

Il laboratorio di Giacomo Cavalli, all’Istituto di Genetica Umana di Montpellier (Università di Montpellier e CNRS), in collaborazione con l’INRA[1], ha dimostrato utilizzando la drosofila l’esistenza di un’eredità epigenetica[2] transgenerazionale. Modificando in maniera transitoria la funzione delle proteine del gruppo Polycomb, la cui funzione è essenziale nello sviluppo, i ricercatori hanno ottenuto delle linee caratterizzate da occhi di colore differente in presenza della stessa sequenza di DNA. Queste differenze dipendono da un grado variabile di repressione genica dipendente dalle proteine Polycomb, che può essere ereditato in modo stabile ma reversibile. Questa eredità epigenetica si applica a linee transgeniche ma anche naturali e può essere modificata dalle condizioni ambientali come la temperatura di crescita. Questi risultati sono pubblicati nella rivista Nature Genetics il 24 Aprile 2017.

 

Insecticide-induced leg loss does not eliminate biting and reproduction in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes

E-mail Stampa

 

Researchers at LSTM have found that mosquitoes that lose multiple legs after contact with insecticide may still be able to spread malaria and lay eggs.

WHO guidelines for testing of long-lasting insecticidal nets are widely used by scientists when comparing the efficacy of different bed nets or measuring the susceptibility of different mosquito populations. Leg loss is a common outcome of insecticide exposure, and these guidelines dictate that mosquitoes that survive insecticide exposure with fewer than three legs should be considered dead. The implicit assumption is that these mosquitoes are unable to bite humans, and therefore do not contribute to malaria transmission. However, a study, published today in Scientific Reports, examined whether leg loss inhibits mosquito biting, revealing that one and two legged mosquitoes can both bite a human hand and lay eggs thereafter.

 

AATS Consensus Statement Helps Manage Treatment of Coronary Anomalies

E-mail Stampa

 

 

 

 

A diagram of the “unroofing” technique, which is one of the recommended surgical interventions discussed in the guidelines.

Researchers are still trying to fully understand anomalous aortic origin of a coronary artery (AAOCA) and its relationship to adverse health outcomes in humans, especially children. Using the most up-to-date literature, as well as the input of leading experts in the field, the American Association for Thoracic Surgery (AATS) has released practical guidelines for the identification and treatment of AAOCA, including an overview of the latest data surrounding population-based risk. Targeting young athletes, new recommendations for testing and treatment of anomalous aortic origin of a coronary artery published in The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery.

 

Study on mice demonstrates the action of strawberries against breast cancer

E-mail Stampa

A study on mice has yielded promising results about the potential benefits of strawberries in preventing or treating breast cancer.


A study by European and Latin American researchers has shown that strawberry extract can inhibit the spread of laboratory-grown breast cancer cells, even when they are inoculated in female mice to induce tumours. However, the scientists do point out that these results from animal testing can not be extrapolated to humans. Past investigations have shown that the ingestion of 500 g of strawberries (between 10 and 15 strawberries) per day offers antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits and reduces blood cholesterol levels. Now, a new study published in the open-access journal 'Scientific Reports' presents promising results on the potential positive effects of the fruit to prevent or treat breast cancer.

 

Gelatine instead of forearm

E-mail Stampa

 

 

The Empa skin model: gelatine on a cotton substrate

The characteristics of human skin are heavily dependent on the hydration of the tissue - in simple terms, the water content. This also changes its interaction with textiles. Up to now, it has only been possible to determine the interaction between human skin and textiles by means of clinical trials on human subjects. Now, EMPA researchers have developed an artificial gelatine-based skin model that simulates human skin almost perfectly. The moisture content of the human skin influences its characteristics. The addition of moisture softens the skin and changes its appearance. This can be seen in DIY work for example: a thin film of perspiration helps to provide better grip when using a hammer or screwdriver; however, excessive perspiration can make the tools slip. The moisture causes the upper layer of the skin (the Stratum corneum) to swell. It becomes softer and smoother and this provides a larger contact area that increases friction. However, too high friction can have a negative effect. The result: blisters on your feet or hands, irritation or rashes. Particularly in connection with textiles that cover our skin, such reactions are frequent and, accordingly, undesirable.

 

Birds sing shorter songs in response to traffic noise

E-mail Stampa

Birds sing differently in response to traffic noise, which potentially affects their ability to attract mates and defend their territory, according to research published in Bioacoustics. The study found that a species of North American flycatcher sings shorter songs at a lower range of frequencies in response to traffic noise levels. The researchers suggest traffic noise reduction, for example through road closures, is a viable option for mitigating this effect. Dr. Katherine Gentry of George Mason University, Virginia, USA and colleagues studied the song of the Eastern wood pewee (Contopus virens) in three parks within the greater Washington, D.C. area. Songs were recorded at sites where the traffic pattern of the nearest road was either relatively constant or reduced on a weekly basis during a 36 hour road closure.

 

Electronics to control plant growth

E-mail Stampa

e-plants David Poxson Photo Thor Balkhed 16

A drug delivery ion pump constructed from organic electronic components also works in plants. Researchers from the Laboratory of Organic Electronics at Linköping University and from the Umeå Plant Science Centre have used such an ion pump to control the root growth of a small flowering plant, the thale cress (Arabidopsis thaliana). In the spring of 2015, researchers from the Laboratory of Organic Electronics at Linköping University presented a microfabricated ion pump with the ability to pump in the correct dose of a naturally occurring pain-relief agent exactly where it was needed. This was a first step towards effective treatment of such conditions as chronic pain. In the autumn of the same year, the researchers presented results showing how they had caused roses to absorb a water-soluble conducting polymer, enabling them to create a fully operational transistor in the rose stem. The term “flower power” suddenly took on a whole new meaning.

 

Is wood a sustainable resource?

E-mail Stampa

Wood can be used as a biofuel and as a raw material for many new and traditional products, but is it sustainable? Forests cover approximately a third of Europe's land area – 215 million hectares – and have ecological, economic and social functions. Healthy forests are important areas of biodiversity, and they capture and store carbon dioxide (CO2), which mitigates climate change. Forests are also recreational areas for all kinds of leisure activities and have long provided important economic resources. In Europe more than three million people are employed in the forest sector and it is estimated to contribute 103 billion Euro to the European economy annually, which is 0.8% of its GDP.

 
 
Pagina 1 di 22

VISITA LA NOSTRA PAGINA FACEBOOK

  • Ultime News
  • News + lette
Il Grafene, il nano-materiale che migliorerà la nostra vita

Il Grafene, il nano-materiale che...

2010-11-23 00:00:00

Musicolor

Musicolor

2009-02-18 00:00:00

I Della Robbia e la storia della terracotta invetriata

I Della Robbia e la storia della...

2009-03-18 00:00:00

Giovanni Papi - Prata Caelestia

Giovanni Papi - Prata Caelestia

2009-11-17 00:00:00

Scienceonline Legal Notice

Scienceonline: Autorizzazione del Tribunale di Roma n 228/2006 del 29/05/2006 Periodicità quotidiana - Pubblicato a Roma - V. A. De Viti de Marco, 50 - Direttore Responsabile: Guido Donati.

Hot Topic

X

.

Pubblica il tuo Articolo

Hai scritto un Articolo scientifico? Inviaci il tuo articolo, verrà valutato e pubblicato se ritenuto valido! Fai conoscere la tua ricerca su Scienzaonline.com!

Ogni mese la nostra rivista è letta da + di 50'000 persone

Information

Information

Ultime News

Così la materia soffice ‘si rilassa’

Così la materia soffice ‘si...

2017-04-26 10:34:09

Studio FBK sul virus Zika pubblicato dalla rivista internazionale PNAS

Studio FBK sul virus Zika pubblicato...

2017-04-26 10:16:07

Orbita a rischio febbre

Orbita a rischio febbre

2017-04-21 12:00:00

Ionosfera col segno meno

Ionosfera col segno meno

2017-04-19 07:28:04

Redazione

Contatta la Redazione di Scienzaonline.com per informazioni riguardanti la rivista
Pagina Contatti

Questo sito utilizza cookie per implementare la tua navigazione e inviarti pubblicità e servizi in linea con le tue preferenze. Chiudendo questo banner, scorrendo questa pagina o cliccando qualunque suo elemento acconsenti all'uso dei cookie. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

I accept cookies from this site.

EU Cookie Directive Module Information