Breaking News:
  • Registrati

Scienzaonline

Home Scienceonline Scienceonline Insecticide-induced leg loss does not eliminate biting and reproduction in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes

Insecticide-induced leg loss does not eliminate biting and reproduction in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes

E-mail Stampa
(0 voti, media 0 di 5)

 

Researchers at LSTM have found that mosquitoes that lose multiple legs after contact with insecticide may still be able to spread malaria and lay eggs.

WHO guidelines for testing of long-lasting insecticidal nets are widely used by scientists when comparing the efficacy of different bed nets or measuring the susceptibility of different mosquito populations. Leg loss is a common outcome of insecticide exposure, and these guidelines dictate that mosquitoes that survive insecticide exposure with fewer than three legs should be considered dead. The implicit assumption is that these mosquitoes are unable to bite humans, and therefore do not contribute to malaria transmission. However, a study, published today in Scientific Reports, examined whether leg loss inhibits mosquito biting, revealing that one and two legged mosquitoes can both bite a human hand and lay eggs thereafter.

The most widely deployed mosquito control tools are insecticide-based, functioning to either repel or kill mosquitoes within a home, these include long lasting insecticide treated bed nets and indoor residual spraying. Pyrethroid treated bed nets are acutely neurotoxic to mosquitoes causing symptoms such as lack of coordination, paralysis and violent spasms. One results often seen in laboratory tests is limb loss and the group tested the assumption that the loss of several limbs would leave the female mosquito unable to play any further part in the spread of malaria. These experiments demonstrated that insecticide-induced leg loss had no significant effect upon

 

blood feeding or egg laying success.

Dr Alison Isaacs is first author on the study. She said: "We conclude that studies of pyrethroid efficacy should not discount mosquitoes that survive insecticide exposure with fewer than six legs, as they may still be capable of biting humans, reproducing, and contributing to malaria transmission."

 

The team are now calling for further work to be carried out in a field setting to see if the results are replicated. "Understanding insecticide efficacy is key to designing a malaria control strategy and these tests must accurately reflect mosquito and insecticide interaction in the field." Continued Dr Isaacs. "We hope that these findings will prompt a re-evaluation of the WHO testing guidelines, as in their current form they may be overestimating the efficacy of bed nets."

This e-mail message is sent on behalf of the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, a charitable company limited by guarantee registered in England and Wales with company number 222655 and whose registered office is at Pembroke Place Liverpool L3 5QA ("LSTM")

 

 

 

 

VISITA LA NOSTRA PAGINA FACEBOOK

  • Ultime News
  • News + lette
Il Grafene, il nano-materiale che migliorerà la nostra vita

Il Grafene, il nano-materiale che...

2010-11-23 00:00:00

Musicolor

Musicolor

2009-02-18 00:00:00

I Della Robbia e la storia della terracotta invetriata

I Della Robbia e la storia della...

2009-03-18 00:00:00

Giovanni Papi - Prata Caelestia

Giovanni Papi - Prata Caelestia

2009-11-17 00:00:00

Scienceonline Legal Notice

Scienceonline: Autorizzazione del Tribunale di Roma n 228/2006 del 29/05/2006 Periodicità quotidiana - Pubblicato a Roma - V. A. De Viti de Marco, 50 - Direttore Responsabile: Guido Donati.

Hot Topic

X

.

Pubblica il tuo Articolo

Hai scritto un Articolo scientifico? Inviaci il tuo articolo, verrà valutato e pubblicato se ritenuto valido! Fai conoscere la tua ricerca su Scienzaonline.com!

Ogni mese la nostra rivista è letta da + di 50'000 persone

Information

Information

Ultime News

Redazione

Contatta la Redazione di Scienzaonline.com per informazioni riguardanti la rivista
Pagina Contatti

Questo sito utilizza cookie per implementare la tua navigazione e inviarti pubblicità e servizi in linea con le tue preferenze. Chiudendo questo banner, scorrendo questa pagina o cliccando qualunque suo elemento acconsenti all'uso dei cookie. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

I accept cookies from this site.

EU Cookie Directive Module Information