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Unlocking the secrets of killer whale diets and their role in climate change

Unlocking the secrets of killer whale diets and their role in climate change

20 Maggio 2022

Killer whale populations are invading the Arctic, causing significant disruptions...

New mechanism for regulating supply of DNA building blocks may lead to better antibiotics

New mechanism for regulating supply of DNA building blocks may lead to better antibiotics

19 Maggio 2022

In a new study published in Nature Communications, researchers from...

New study reveals impact of sea level rise on human groups during Mesolithic and Neolithic periods

New study reveals impact of sea level rise on human groups during Mesolithic and Neolithic periods

19 Maggio 2022

A study carried out in the area around the Pego-Oliva...

Snake-like limb loss in a Carboniferous amniote

11 Aprile 2022

Among living tetrapods, many lineages have converged on a snake-like...

Protein boosts height growth in girls

Protein boosts height growth in girls

07 Aprile 2022

Protein boosts height growth in girls. Just seven grams over...

Fungicide combo against devastating red clover disease

Fungicide combo against devastating red clover disease

07 Marzo 2022

Red clover, an important forage crop for grazing cattle, can...

Turtle species in Eastern Europe survived the event that killed the dinosaurs

Turtle species in Eastern Europe survived the event that killed the dinosaurs

02 Marzo 2022

Plastron (left) and carapace (right) of the new turtle species...

Targeting the brain's energy metabolism may hold the key for treating Parkinson's disease

Targeting the brain's energy metabolism may hold the key for treating Parkinson's disease

02 Marzo 2022

Nicotinamide riboside (NR) is amember of the vitamin B3 family,...

Lunedì, 04 Settembre 2017

 

Prehistoric human skeleton in the Chan Hol Cave near Tulúm on the Yucatán peninsula prior to looting by unknown cave divers. Picture: Tom Poole, Liquid Jungle Lab 

 

Heidelberg researchers date prehistoric skeleton found in a cave in Yucatán

A prehistoric human skeleton found on the Yucatán Peninsula is at least 13,000 years old and most likely dates from a glacial period at the end of the most recent ice age, the late Pleistocene. A German-Mexican team of researchers led by Prof. Dr Wolfgang Stinnesbeck and Arturo González González has now dated the fossil skeleton based on a stalagmite that grew on the hip bone. “The bones from the Chan Hol Cave near the city of Tulúm discovered five years ago represent one of the oldest finds of human bones on the American continent and are evidence of an unexpectedly early settlement in Southern Mexico,” says Prof. Stinnesbeck, who is an earth scientist at Heidelberg University. The research findings have now been published in PLOS ONE.

Pubblicato in Scienceonline
Lunedì, 04 Settembre 2017 13:23

Asthma Medicine Halves Risk of Parkinson's

 

 

* By studying the effect of 1000 medicines, researchers discovered that medicine against asthma and blood pressure is linked to the risk of getting Parkinson´s disease.

* While the use of asthma medicine halves the risk of getting Parkinson's, one type of medicine against high blood pressure doubles the risk.

* The researchers examined more than 100 million prescriptions ordered over the last 11 years in Norway.

* These discoveries could be the start of a radically new treatment of Parkinson's patients.

Parkinson´s disease is a chronic disease with unknown causes. The disease destroys the brain cells that control body movements. Shivering, stiff arms and legs and poor coordination are typical symptoms of Parkinson's. The symptoms may develop slowly, and it sometimes takes time to make a correct diagnosis. Researchers at the Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care (IGS) at the University of Bergen (UiB) have completed a large study that included data from the Norwegian Prescription Database, in cooperation with researchers at Harvard University.

Pubblicato in Scienceonline

 

A team of biologists has found an unexpected source for the brain's development, a finding that offers new insights into the building of the nervous system. The research, which appears in the journal Science, discovered that glia, a collection of non-neuronal cells that had long been regarded as passive support cells, in fact are vital to nerve-cell development in the brain. "The results lead us to revise the often neuro-centric view of brain development to now appreciate the contributions for non-neuronal cells such as glia," explains Vilaiwan Fernandes, a postdoctoral fellow in New York University's Department of Biology and the study's lead author. "Indeed, our study found that fundamental questions in brain development with regard to the timing, identity, and coordination of nerve cell birth can only be understood when the glial contribution is accounted for." The brain is made up of two broad cell types, nerve cells or neurons and glia, which are non-nerve cells that make up more than half the volume of the brain. Neurobiologists have tended to focus on the former because these are the cells that form networks that process information.

Pubblicato in Scienceonline

 

 

Climate warming reduces the number of plant species in the tundra, but plant-eating animals, such as reindeer and voles, can turn this negative effect into something positive. The results of a study coordinated from Umeå University in Sweden are now published in Nature Communications. “By eating tall and wide-leaved plants, reindeer can increase light availability and thus allow more plant species to co-exist and benefit from warmer conditions,” says Elina Kaarlejärvi, post-doctoral researcher at Umeå University, who led the study. Earlier studies suggest that tundra plant diversity will decrease in response to a warmer climate. However, it is important to know whether the response depends on the abundance of grazing animals, particularly reindeer, voles and lemmings, which are very common in tundra ecosystems. Researchers at Umeå University in Sweden, and Oulu University in Finland, tested this through experimental warming of vegetation on tundra meadows with and without reindeer and voles.

Pubblicato in Scienceonline

 

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